PLRHeadquarters Blog Mitch Claymore's Private Label Rights weblog

27Feb/12Off

Me Like Eucalyptus!

And who doesn’t?

Whenever I fall for a blog title like the above, as often as not I’ve already whizzed past it while speed-scanning for something else. But if there is such a thing as latent curiosity effect, I’ve got it. The chances are pretty good that a few moments later I’ll be thinking, ‘What th??? and go back to see what the heck this is about…

 Koalas? An obscure Aussie dance craze? Lovin' them eucsNo matter what it turns out to be, I probably won’t be able to resist going back to find out. So that blog’s author wins the first big battle: the one for eyeballs.

Which is what prompted this discussion: it's about creating titles for real estate blog entries.

It is said that blog authors fall into one of three categories: those who blog to entertain themselves, those who blog to entertain others, and those who (like us) blog as part of their marketing strategy. We blog first to attract attention, then to establish and build relationships.

Since we are local, we can't match national firms who can mount expensive TV and print campaigns which do little more than repeat their brand name with some positive association (an association which sometimes can be amazing in how little it has to do with what they are actually selling). In residential real estate, the odds of gathering the kind of eyeballs we want with a title like Me Like Eucalyptus is remote.

For us, a great real estate blog title may incorporate the curiosity factor (or the surprise factor), but that’s only half the assignment. It needs also to connect in a real way with our customers’ hot buttons. Examples might be “Home Sales Hit Apple!”; “[town name] Realty Dervish Whirls Clockwise”; “The Movers Blocked My Escape Route!”… or just about any curious title that touches on some aspect of listing, buying, selling, moving in or out – the issues that are floating close to the top of prospective clients’ consciousness.

While it’s not always easy to lasso a wildly improbable blog title and tie it into a meaningful blog entry, when you succeed in doing so you have a true real estate blog title champ: one that's both informative and memorable.

 “Home Sales Hit Apple”, for instance, might deal with the prospective Wha?home seller’s need to become their own William Tell by keeping their eye on the target -- buyers who appreciate their property’s unique features; “Dervish” might be a tongue-in-cheek way of announcing recent closings; “Escape”, could chronicle a recent client’s moving adventure.

Me Like Eucalyptus? Did I ever tell you about the time I was living near the beach in Southern California? A doctor friend from back east insisted on taking home some leafy branches from my back yard. I'd always thought those trees were just sort of smelly, but he told me…

17Dec/11Off

Is your real estate blog just slipslidin’ away?

I hear it all the time, and it sounds awfully familiar. It used to happen to me, too – I’d make a new years resolution nailing down exactly how diligent I was going to be in keeping my blog and site fresh fresh fresh, and then…I bet you know what happens next…

Life happens. Business happens. Everything else in the world rains in, and when the blogger slipslidin'floodwaters recede, chances are most of us are left with blog sites with an ancient posting date right there for all to see.

 The message that sends comes over loud and clear. Last entry four months ago. Might as well say “Dead as a parrot in a Python skit”. Who wants to read a blog that’s four months out of date? When your blog is headlining Labor Day grilling notes but Santa is ringing his bell outside the mall entrance, count your readers and your blog among the dearly departed.  Potential clients who used to stop by to catch the latest on your local market will have given up. Your hard-earned SEO juice has gone bad in the fridge. You can almost see the cobwebs hanging off your byline; wrinkle your nose at the musty aroma…

 The message that sends comes over loud and clear. Last entry four months ago. Might as well say “Dead as a parrot in a Python skit”. Who wants to read a blog that’s four months out of date? When your blog is headlining Labor Day grilling notes but Santa is ringing his bell outside the mall entrance, count your readers and your blog among the dearly departed.  Potential clients who used to stop by to catch the latest on your local market have given up by now. Your hard-earned SEO juice has gone bad in the fridge. You can almost see the cobwebs hanging off your byline; wrinkle your nose at the musty aroma…

Enough! It’s almost the New Year, so what better time for all of us to begin anew! I for one have long  since determined to make it a hallmark of 2012 to put major effort into rewarding every visit to my blog (and my home page, my tweetperch, etc.) with new material.  And whenever the inevitable happens and I can’t steal the hour it usually takes to create a worthwhile entry from scratch, instead of just giving up I’ll spice up some quality Private Label Rights material and skip straight to the final edit.

 If you find yourself avoiding eye contact with your own real estate blog because the last post coincides with the Grand Opening of the Great Pyramid at Giza, take heart. RealtyPLR was founded by real estate pros who recognized that this is a universal problem in the Internet Age, and they put some elbow grease into developing a low-cost solution: http://www.realtyplr.com.

 So how is it that I, a writer/editor, could ever have fallen into the same inertia trap as everyone else? Must have something to do with this year’s massive changeover from monthly to weekly releases of new articles. Just ask the cobbler’s children. I believe even they had to make up a nursery rhyme before their father would do anything about their bare feet problem.

12May/11Off

Am I Imagining This – Or Can Google Get A Little Pricey?

Let’s try and keep this just between you and me…(we wouldn’t want any of this to get out to the other brokers and agents who are trying to grab some of that search engine traffic). Is anyone else listening? Good!

Here’s something I’m beginning to suspect. It could be that some Google AdWords campaigns might get a little costly. In fact, that might even be deliberate!

I know it sounds crazy, but just stay with me on this. Here’s what I’ve detected. When you go to the trouble to build a terrific site — including a home page that is artfully constructed to feature the keywords that will match many potential clients looking for your specialty in your area — and then designed a Google AdWords ad that features the very same keywords, and then added those exact same keywords to your campaign…after a while, you might occasionally note that the amount you are asked to bid in order to have your ad appear on the first page is sort of…well, costly.

And sometimes you’ll also notice that it isn’t because of landing page quality or loading time — it’s costly because of ‘relevance’. And since it couldn’t possibly be more relevant (since all the terms are in perfect harmony, and since your firm has been doing business for years and nobody in your office has ever been sent to prison), you may check out what Google says about this, and conclude that the reason it costs so much is because the general public isn’t clicking on your ad much.

You may also sense that the reason they aren’t clicking on your ad much is BECAUSE THEY CAN’T SEE THE DA**ED AD BECAUSE IT’S NOT ON THE FIRST PAGE!

Sorry. I don’t mean to shout.

The good news is that you can eventually cure this by paying an exhorbitant amount to get it to appear on the first page where people can see it, so they can click on it. Then it will become relevant enough to Google so that they will not have to charge you so much anymore. That is, after you’ve paid them whatever they want for however long they tell you to. They’ll be the judge of that.

Another way to go: practice yoga, and let the material world go. Or take a few deep breaths and redirect your attention to building organic (unpaid) traffic. You may think I’ve got an ax to grind by the second recommendation since it’s what we do. That would be hard to deny.

Ommmmmmmmmm…

5Feb/10Off

PLR SCAMS REVISITED (IV)

From time to time we are privileged to enjoy sharing the experience of the first-time visitors to the Private Label Rights universe. Often such innocents have run into the term “PLR” while investigating Search Engine Optimization techniques: he or she knows it has something to do with freshening a site’s content and making sure Google is aware of the fact. But ‘PLR’ and ‘Private Label Rights’ aren’t terms that explain themselves, so they warrant a bit more discussion.

Since searches for  ’PLR’ is how a goodly number of subscribers find us, somebody from PLRHeadquarters is duty-bound to keep tabs on what comes up when you google it. Since I have a well-developed sense of humor, I’m usually elected. These forays never fail to provide chills and spills, scams and spams, and the same kind of general merriment experienced when you’re suckered into the Clown Toss “skill” game at the dimly-lit far end of a carnival midway (no offense to the gypsies, who actually do have a Code of Honor).

This last time, we decided to Bing “PLR value”. We found the resulting galaxy of values much unchanged. Try Binging it yourself, and you’ll come up with the usual Opportunities of a Lifetime. About 627,000 of them, to narrow it down. Click on 95% of them, and you’ll be urged to purchase subscriptions or packages or booklets or videos dealing with some subject or other (sometimes, apparently, ALL subjects). And you will usually be encouraged to sell them again, probably to the next person who Bings “PLR value”. And best of all, you are urged to charge more than you paid in the first place, and to keep selling them over and over again!

Who ever heard of a better bargain? Just think: you’ll make money with little or no effort (“97% of the work has been done for you”) and then just relax. The relaxation never stops. You’re supposed to sit back and watch the coin roll in…no, POUR in (assuming you bother to watch the Free Bonus Video about Thinking Positively).

These ubiquitous ‘PLR ’ offers are clearly aimed at inciting would-be internet entrepreneurs to set up their own PLR sites to offer the articles/videos/e-books they just bought to the next set of would-be internet entrepreneurs for sale to even more internet entrepreneurs who can set up their own sites, etc.

It’s a little like what happens the first time a child sits down in a barbershop: they look in the mirror and are amazed to find an endless progression of images of familiar-looking children getting more and more haircuts! And like the size of those images, these ‘PLR’ products somehow diminish in value until, by about the fiftieth iteration, all value sort of disappears in the distance. In case this business model seems vaguely familiar, we all recall Bernie Madoff, who perfected a much bolder version of a similar idea.

The good news is that after Binging ‘PLR value’, somewhere on those results pages, squished in between the 625,000 values, there are firms who in fact offer content that’s worth paying for (i.e., fresh, engaging articles written by real degree-holding English-speaking writers who never allow their stuff to be resold).

Other than (obviously) our group, I can’t really propose a foolproof way of identifying who those actual PLR creators are. But who they aren’t is a good deal easier — for guidance I refer you to my sporadically-updated monumental work on the subject, “20 Foolproof and Amusing Ways to Spot PLR Scams”. And no – it isn’t available for sale or resale (even though it is certain to drive massive targeted traffic and is certainly selling at the amazingly deep-discounted one-time-only limited bargain price offer while it lasts)…

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