PLRHeadquarters Blog Mitch Claymore's Private Label Rights weblog

27Nov/12Off

It’s Your Own Private Label Wine…

REALTYPLR's ARTICLES ARE a little like a jarred pasta sauce that mom doctors with her special touch before serving -- or a private label wine produced Like Your Own Fine Winewith your name on it. They are the shortcut that help Realtors get more leads (and you know what that leads to).

 This week’s tips:

 Advantages and Pitfalls for Mortgage Co-Signings

Editor's Note: “Buy a home” is a heavily coveted search term. We’ve combined it here with the niche topic “mortgage co-signing” to help attract potential first-time home buyers (or their property owning parents!). Take advantage of both search terms here and geo-code both.

 Squeezing More Profit from Your Home Sale

Editor’s note: Every seller loves the word “profit”: if you have a hot tip or unique facet to your marketing plan, this blog is a great place to brag about it!

 Don't Let Rental Property Manage You

Editor's Note: With rental rates on the rise nationwide investment properties are hot topic these days - and with that topic comes property managment. Take advantage of the interest with this article aimed at attracting potential investor clients.

In the Wake of Home Foreclosure

Editor's Note: "Home Foreclosures" combined with your geocoded territory name is sought often -- even for web searchers who are only interested in the state of real estate in the area. 

12May/11Off

Am I Imagining This – Or Can Google Get A Little Pricey?

Let’s try and keep this just between you and me…(we wouldn’t want any of this to get out to the other brokers and agents who are trying to grab some of that search engine traffic). Is anyone else listening? Good!

Here’s something I’m beginning to suspect. It could be that some Google AdWords campaigns might get a little costly. In fact, that might even be deliberate!

I know it sounds crazy, but just stay with me on this. Here’s what I’ve detected. When you go to the trouble to build a terrific site — including a home page that is artfully constructed to feature the keywords that will match many potential clients looking for your specialty in your area — and then designed a Google AdWords ad that features the very same keywords, and then added those exact same keywords to your campaign…after a while, you might occasionally note that the amount you are asked to bid in order to have your ad appear on the first page is sort of…well, costly.

And sometimes you’ll also notice that it isn’t because of landing page quality or loading time — it’s costly because of ‘relevance’. And since it couldn’t possibly be more relevant (since all the terms are in perfect harmony, and since your firm has been doing business for years and nobody in your office has ever been sent to prison), you may check out what Google says about this, and conclude that the reason it costs so much is because the general public isn’t clicking on your ad much.

You may also sense that the reason they aren’t clicking on your ad much is BECAUSE THEY CAN’T SEE THE DA**ED AD BECAUSE IT’S NOT ON THE FIRST PAGE!

Sorry. I don’t mean to shout.

The good news is that you can eventually cure this by paying an exhorbitant amount to get it to appear on the first page where people can see it, so they can click on it. Then it will become relevant enough to Google so that they will not have to charge you so much anymore. That is, after you’ve paid them whatever they want for however long they tell you to. They’ll be the judge of that.

Another way to go: practice yoga, and let the material world go. Or take a few deep breaths and redirect your attention to building organic (unpaid) traffic. You may think I’ve got an ax to grind by the second recommendation since it’s what we do. That would be hard to deny.

Ommmmmmmmmm…

22Jul/10Off

Think like a Google

You haven’t found me blogging much lately. For a while now, I’ve been determined to avoid falling into the annoying company of those who blog on a schedule rather than when they come across a fresh insight or other useful revelation.

But then the phone rang a few minutes ago. I found myself listening to a robotic (though admittedly fetchingly feminine) voice urging me to stay on the  line. She proposed that I press One, which would not only extend our conversation but also give me the lowdown on how it was that she could guarantee a low-cost way to get my website “onto Google’s first page”.

Now it may be possible that since she is a robot and Google is a robot, the two of them have cooked up something that can make this improbable promise come true, but I doubt it(so I pressed Two).

This was not the first pitch for Googlic domination I’ve been subjected to this week…nor, if you receive a normal volume of e-spam, would it have been the first for you. Large amounts of otherwise productive time are being lavished in pursuit of high placement on the SERPs (Search Engine Results Pages), because they are in fact the virtual equivalents of “location location location” for brick-and-mortar outlets (á la March’s rant).

Since claiming a URL costs a tiny fraction of renting a retail storefront, and since outfitting an actual store is likewise much more expensive than developing a website, the inevitable downside is what MBAs call a low Barrier to Entry. In other words, overwhelming competition. The reality is exactly that: since anybody can afford to go into virtual business, most of them have.

Into this daunting competitive thicket go all of us, at first optimistically hoping to find a piece of web engineering trickery that will yield bigtime Google placement. If there ever were such a simplistic fix, it didn’t last for long.  We know this because we have learned to think like a Google.

Googles are busy busy robots. Always in a hurry to finish one job and get onto the next, there aren’t enough hours in the day for them to get everything done. But that doesn’t mean they are sloppy or likely to skip over important details. But perhaps because so many SEO (search engine optimization) experts have tried to trick them, they have become somewhat mistrustful. When you think like a Google, you find yourself becoming downright suspicious.

Take, for instance, meta tags. When you whiz through a page while pretending you’re a Google, you learn to ignore just about everything jammed into those meta tags unless they relate to what’s actually on the page. You start to figure they’re put there to keep you from checking out the real deal…what a human reader sees when s/he looks at the actual page.

When you think like a Google, you  begin to actually resent pages that promise keyword riches in its meta tags, then neglects them on the actual page. Or has repetitious keyword jumbles all over the place. Or the exact same information you ran into a year ago on a thousand other pages, or phrases that any English-speaker would find unnatural, or anything else that seems out of place to a human being.

The thing is, thinking like a Google means resenting those who evidently assume you as a Google are less than human. It also can make you angry, judgmental, and even make you want to penalize somebody.

By the way, in case you actually are a real Google, I guess you know how the penalizing thing works.

-Your Human Friend,

Mitch
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5Feb/10Off

PLR SCAMS REVISITED (IV)

From time to time we are privileged to enjoy sharing the experience of the first-time visitors to the Private Label Rights universe. Often such innocents have run into the term “PLR” while investigating Search Engine Optimization techniques: he or she knows it has something to do with freshening a site’s content and making sure Google is aware of the fact. But ‘PLR’ and ‘Private Label Rights’ aren’t terms that explain themselves, so they warrant a bit more discussion.

Since searches for  ’PLR’ is how a goodly number of subscribers find us, somebody from PLRHeadquarters is duty-bound to keep tabs on what comes up when you google it. Since I have a well-developed sense of humor, I’m usually elected. These forays never fail to provide chills and spills, scams and spams, and the same kind of general merriment experienced when you’re suckered into the Clown Toss “skill” game at the dimly-lit far end of a carnival midway (no offense to the gypsies, who actually do have a Code of Honor).

This last time, we decided to Bing “PLR value”. We found the resulting galaxy of values much unchanged. Try Binging it yourself, and you’ll come up with the usual Opportunities of a Lifetime. About 627,000 of them, to narrow it down. Click on 95% of them, and you’ll be urged to purchase subscriptions or packages or booklets or videos dealing with some subject or other (sometimes, apparently, ALL subjects). And you will usually be encouraged to sell them again, probably to the next person who Bings “PLR value”. And best of all, you are urged to charge more than you paid in the first place, and to keep selling them over and over again!

Who ever heard of a better bargain? Just think: you’ll make money with little or no effort (“97% of the work has been done for you”) and then just relax. The relaxation never stops. You’re supposed to sit back and watch the coin roll in…no, POUR in (assuming you bother to watch the Free Bonus Video about Thinking Positively).

These ubiquitous ‘PLR ’ offers are clearly aimed at inciting would-be internet entrepreneurs to set up their own PLR sites to offer the articles/videos/e-books they just bought to the next set of would-be internet entrepreneurs for sale to even more internet entrepreneurs who can set up their own sites, etc.

It’s a little like what happens the first time a child sits down in a barbershop: they look in the mirror and are amazed to find an endless progression of images of familiar-looking children getting more and more haircuts! And like the size of those images, these ‘PLR’ products somehow diminish in value until, by about the fiftieth iteration, all value sort of disappears in the distance. In case this business model seems vaguely familiar, we all recall Bernie Madoff, who perfected a much bolder version of a similar idea.

The good news is that after Binging ‘PLR value’, somewhere on those results pages, squished in between the 625,000 values, there are firms who in fact offer content that’s worth paying for (i.e., fresh, engaging articles written by real degree-holding English-speaking writers who never allow their stuff to be resold).

Other than (obviously) our group, I can’t really propose a foolproof way of identifying who those actual PLR creators are. But who they aren’t is a good deal easier — for guidance I refer you to my sporadically-updated monumental work on the subject, “20 Foolproof and Amusing Ways to Spot PLR Scams”. And no – it isn’t available for sale or resale (even though it is certain to drive massive targeted traffic and is certainly selling at the amazingly deep-discounted one-time-only limited bargain price offer while it lasts)…

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